How to melt gold at room temperature

When the tension rises, unexpected things can happen  not least when it comes to gold atoms. Researchers from, among others, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now managed, for the first time, to make the surface of a gold object melt at room temperature. Ludvig de Knoop, from Chalmers’ Department of Physics, placed a small Read more about How to melt gold at room temperature[…]

How electric fish got their big brains

Helmet-heads of the freshwater fish world, African mormyrid fishes are known for having a brain-to-body size ratio that is similar to humans.But there’s actually a great deal of variation in the size of mormyrid brains. These differences provide an opportunity to look at what’s behind the bulk. Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have Read more about How electric fish got their big brains[…]

3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) — a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than ever before. Their work, published in Scientific Reports, demonstrates an x-ray imaging technique, called x-ray fluorescence microscopy Read more about 3D chemical maps of single bacteria[…]

New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter

In the Standard Model of particle physics, there is almost no difference between matter and antimatter. But there is an abundance of evidence that our observable universe is made up only of matter — if there was any antimatter, it would annihilate with nearby matter to produce very high intensity gamma radiation, which has not Read more about New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter[…]

Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s dramatic effect on stingrays’ sensory abilities

Marine fishes rely on their sensory systems to survive. A study is the first to quantify the physiological effects of whole crude oil on the olfactory function of a marine vertebrate  the Atlantic stingray. Results of the study, confirm that exposure to crude oil, at concentrations mimicking those measured in coastal areas following the Deepwater Read more about Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s dramatic effect on stingrays’ sensory abilities[…]

Purple bacteria ‘batteries’ turn sewage into clean energy

Organic compounds in household sewage and industrial wastewater are a rich potential source of energy, bioplastics and even proteins for animal feed — but with no efficient extraction method, treatment plants discard them as contaminants. Now researchers have found an environmentally-friendly and cost-effective solution. Published in Frontiers in Energy Research, their study is the first to Read more about Purple bacteria ‘batteries’ turn sewage into clean energy[…]

Graphene takes a step towards renewable fuel

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future, using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide. They have now taken an important step towards this goal, and developed a method that Read more about Graphene takes a step towards renewable fuel[…]

A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones

Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It’s a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years. A research team Read more about A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones[…]

New material cleans and splits water

Some of the most useful and versatile materials today are the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs are a class of materials demonstrating structural versatility, high porosity, fascinating optical and electronic properties, all of which makes them promising candidates for a variety of applications, including gas capture and separation, sensors, and photocatalysis. Because MOFs are so versatile Read more about New material cleans and splits water[…]

Unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that a common coral species might have evolved unique immune strategies to cope with environmental change. Roughly 30 percent of the cauliflower coral’s (Pocillopora damicornis) genome was unique compared to several other reef-building corals. In Read more about Unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species[…]